Anomalies in Metro project highlighted in report

Chandigarh: Members of the Indian Institute of Architects, Chandigarh, Punjab Chapter, have prepared a report highlighting anomalies in the Chandigarh Metro project. The report is now forwarded to the Union Ministry of Urban Development because the Chandigarh Administration has sent the proposal of Metro project to the Ministry for clearance.

Surinder Bahga, former chairman of the chapter and nominated Councillor, said they sent this report to Kamal Nath, Union Minister of Urban Development because the ministry could consider these points before finalising the project so as to ensure optimum utilisation of public money and resources.

In the report it was mentioned that the technology being proposed for the Chandigarh metro would be outdated by the time Chandigarh Metro Project would be commissioned. It would be about 45 years old. The technology was changing very fast and the public money would not be put to optimum use. It was also pointed out that Chandigarh was a world class city, therefore, if any metro project had to be commissioned, it should be of the latest technology.

On the proposed metro stations, it was highlighted that the metro stations were opening into residential areas, which would cause a lot of inconvenience to the residents of that area.

It was also mentioned that for the Chandigarh Metro Project, cross system of network being proposed by the DMRC report was not suitable for the region of Chandigarh. Moreover, this is one of the most inefficient MRTS systems in the world. (barring geographical limitations). This type of network has hardly been used in any major cities of the world.

The report also mentioned that as per the study of RITES, the major inflow of traffic was from the neighboring areas. Over 4 lakh daily commuters enter Chandigarh from Panchkula, Mohali, Zirakpur, Kharar, Pinjore, Rajpura etc. Therefore, there was a need to integrate these areas by an efficient transport system so that they were well connected with the city also.

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