Hitachi wins additional Order for Rail Cars from Taiwan Railway Administration

Hitachi Wins an Additional Order for 16 Tilting Rail Cars for Limited Express Service from the Taiwan Railway Administration of Taiwan

Tokyo, Japan — Hitachi, Ltd. (TSE: 6501, “Hitachi”) today announced that it has won an additional order for 16 TEMU1000 tilting rail cars (2 train sets) for a limited express service from the Taiwan Railway Administration (“TRA”) of Taiwan. The rail cars are to be delivered within the 2015/16 financial year, and scheduled to enter service from June 2016 onwards.

The global rail market is growing steadily, and is expected to generate approximately 20 trillion yen per year from 2015 to 2017. Demand for rail infrastructure in Taiwan is also increasing. Notably, the number of annual railway passengers rose to 970 million in 2013, which is an increase of 105% on the previous year.

Hitachi manufactured and delivered to the TRA a total of 48 TEMU1000 rail cars (6 train sets), consisting of two separate shipments of 24 TEMU1000 rail cars in 2006 and 2007. These rail cars have been in commercial service since May 2007, operating as Taiwan’s first tilting trains for a limited express service. The trains are deployed on a route that spans a total operating distance of 443 km. The route runs from Douliu in western Taiwan to areas near the northern Taiwan coast with many curved segments via Taipei, and eastwards towards Shoufeng. The trains are nicknamed “Taroko” after the scenic Taroko Gorge near the major city of Hualien city in eastern Taiwan. The introduction of tilting rail cars has improved speed and comfort, while enabling the use of the existing rail infrastructure even on routes that have many curved segments.

The TRA has highly commended Hitachi for its TEMU1000 rail cars based on their operational record of the past eight years or so, as well as for its after-sales service, passenger comfort, design, quality, reliability and other aspects. This positive recognition helped Hitachi to win the order for the additional cars. Hitachi has won orders for 16 cars (2 train sets). Hitachi plans to start manufacturing the rail cars in January 2015 and to deliver them within the 2015/16 financial year.

Hitachi has Japan’s strongest delivery record for tilting rail cars for a limited express service and active tilt systems, which have been widely recognised for their engineering capabilities and reliability. The cars to be delivered will be fitted with computer-controlled active tilt systems. When the cars approach a curved segment, the system will automatically tilt the cars, at a maximum of 5 degrees, according to the track curvature. This enables the cars to travel through the curves at an increased speed, which is 25 km / h faster than that of trains without computer-controlled active tilt systems, while maintaining passenger comfort.

Hitachi will continue to provide high-quality, highly reliable rail cars to assist with the further development of Taiwan’s rail infrastructure and accelerate the global development of its railway systems.

Specifications of Tilting cars for Limited Express Service

Type TEMU100 Electric Multiple Unit (EMU) Train
Formation 8-car formation (4M4T)
Electric AC 25kV 60 Hz catenary system
Track gauge 1,067mm
Maximum operating speed 130km/h
Maximum design speed 150km/h
Starting acceleration 2.2km/h/s
Control system VVVF Inverter control (IGBT element)
Safety system ERTMS/ETCS Level1

About Hitachi, Ltd.

Hitachi, Ltd. (TSE: 6501), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, delivers innovations that answer society’s challenges with our talented team and proven experience in global markets. The company’s consolidated revenues for fiscal 2013 (ended March 31, 2014) totaled 9,616 billion yen ($93.4 billion). Hitachi is focusing more than ever on the Social Innovation Business, which includes infrastructure systems, information & telecommunication systems, power systems, construction machinery, high functional materials & components, automotive systems, healthcare and others.http://www.hitachi.com

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